WARWICK AND RETURN FROM STRATFORD UPON AVON

 

Route Info | Boats | Map overview of route | Cruising Notes | Maps & Guides | Links | Pub Guide

 

You can do this route from :
Stratford-upon-Avon Marina

This route takes you from the home of William Shakespeare and the Royal Shakespeare Theatre and the historic town of Stratford upon Avon, to the historic town of Warwick, home to a fabulous medieval castle.

Royal Shakespeare Theatre or the Swan Theatre, both of which are on the banks of the River Avon.
There are open-top coach tours of notable places, such as Hall's Croft, Anne Hathaway's Cottage and Shakespeare's Birthplace.

The original Castle at Warwick was built on a motte and bailey constructed by William the Conqueror in 1068, with the present exterior being a good example of a C14th fortification. The gardens of the Castle were designed by Capability Brown.

Also cruise over Edstone aqueduct - the longest aqueduct in England

Route Info

Route Facts & Figures

Cruising Days : 7.00

Cruising Time : 32.00 hours

Total Distance : 40.00 miles

Number of Locks : 102

Number of Tunnels : 2

Number of Aqueducts : 2

Read the Cruising Notes

Read our cruising notes to help you plan your canal boat holiday

Read our cruising notes.

 

Download the Cruising Notes

We also have the cruising notes available for download in PDF (acrobat Reader)

Download our cruising notes.

 

 

 

 

Cruising Notes

Day 1

Unless you are planning to stay a night in Stratford, leave the mooring to head for Canada Bridge No. 60, about 2 miles away.
Canada Bridge is just north of the Wilmcote locks, a flight of 11 locks, rising just over 77 feet in total. Before these locks, is Bishopton Lock, on the outskirts of Stratford.
Once moored, Wilmcote village will be to your left. There is a fine old pub here, called The Mary

Arden Inn, due to its proximity to Mary Arden's house. Real ales, and bar and restaurant food are available. There is a beer garden, and children are welcome. Nearby, is another pub called The Masons Arms, with open fires, and also serving food and real ales. Again, children are welcome.
Once moored here, you will have cruised 2 miles and navigated 12 locks in 2¾ hours.

Day 2

Leaving your mooring, you will be heading for Lowsonford Narrows (just past Claverdon Top Lock No. 33), 7 miles away.
As you cruise out of Wilmcote, you will be heading towards Edstone Aqueduct (South end). This is the longest aqueduct in England, with a towpath that is level with the canal bed, making it even more unique. At this end of the aqueduct, there is a very pretty cottage.
For a while the canal straightens out as you head towards Wootton Wawen. After navigating Bearley Lock, the canal curves to the left, and as it straightens again, you will see Austy Wood and Manor away to your right. A bend to the right takes you over another aqueduct, and Wootton Wawen is to your left.
If you want to moor up here, there is a conveniently placed pub, called The Navigation, which is in the basin. Real ale and home-cooked food are available. There is a garden with children's play area, overlooking the canal.
Continuing, you may just be able to see Wootton Pool over to your left, as you wend your way through the peaceful countryside. You will soon get to Preston Bagot Locks, Claverdon Top Lock, then Yarningdale Aqueduct. You will now be able to moor for the night if you wish.
Canalside, there is a pub called The Fleur-de-Lys, at Lowsonford. You can moor here, but you must ask first, and don't tie up to the trees. Again, real ale and bar meals are available, and there is a large canalside garden, which is safe for children to play in.
It will take around 4¼ hours to cruise the 7 miles and 7 locks to here.

Day 3
Today's destination is Hatton Top Lock No. 46.
You will have a few more locks to navigate today, and at the Kingswood Junction you will leave the Stratford Canal to join the Grand Union Canal.
Cruising northwards, the canal crosses the M40, disturbing the relative peace for a while, as you meander through mostly open countryside. To the right, you may see the Grand Union Canal, as it too makes its way to Kingswood Junction.
Once at Kingswood Junction, you will have to turn right onto the Lapworth Link, then right again onto the Grand Union Canal, so almost doubling back on yourself.
Cruise a mile or two along the canal to Rowington, and you will find a traditional country pub, called Tom O' The Wood, serving food and real ales. Rowington itself, is a small village, five miles north-west of Warwick. It's well worth a visit, with the pub at its hub.
A little further, after a sharp right, then left bend, you will see the north-west end of Shrewley Tunnel fast approaching. The tunnel is 433 yards long and is wide enough for two boats to pass each other. It is very wet in this tunnel, so keep your hoods up!
Wooded hills to your left, conceal Hatton village. As you approach the village, you will see the first of the locks – Hatton Top Lock No. 46 – where you can moor for the night, before tackling the locks, which when you reach Hatton Bottom Lock No. 26, will raise you up the canal by 142' 6”.
Hatton has much to offer, and you might like to go to Hatton Country World, where they have craft workshops, rare breeds, art and craft shops, a children's play area, and much more.
There is a pub in Hatton called The Waterman, which also does takeaway fish and chips.
If you moor here, you will have cruised 7 miles and navigated 11 locks, in 4½ hours.

Day 4
Today, you will cruise through the Hatton Locks, to the Saltisford Arm, where you will need to turn, either tonight, or in the morning, and moor at Hatton Bottom Lock No. 26.
Leaving your mooring, you will immediately encounter the Hatton Locks. Once through them, it is only a short cruise to the Saltisford Arm. Turn here, then cruise the short distance back to Hatton Bottom Lock No. 26.
Saltisford Canal Centre, not far from the lock, has pump-out facilities, launderette, toilets, gift shop, etc. There are also gardens and picnic areas, and good access into Warwick.
Warwick Castle is a must! See the website www.warwick-castle.com for information on opening times, ticket prices, events, etc.
There are many pubs, cafe's, restaurants, etc. to choose from in Warwick.
It is 3 miles to here, having navigated 21 locks, taking 4¾ hours.

Day 5
Day 6
Day 7
Day 8
Retrace your journey back to Stratford-upon-Avon Marina (One Elm Lock).


Out and About in Stratford and Warwick
Stratford-upon-Avon is most famous for being the birthplace of Shakespeare.
If you want to spend a night here, either before setting off, or at the end of your cruise, you could perhaps book tickets for a production at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre or the Swan Theatre, both of which are on the banks of the River Avon.
There are open-top coach tours of notable places, such as Hall's Croft, Anne Hathaway's Cottage and Shakespeare's Birthplace.
Shops are plentiful, or if you prefer, why not take a picnic on the banks of the canal, among the open parkland?
www.rsc.org.uk/whats-on
Warwick's most famous landmark is Warwick Castle.
The original Castle was built on a motte and bailey constructed by William the Conqueror in 1068, with the present exterior being a good example of a C14th fortification. The gardens of the Castle were designed by Capability Brown.
www.warwick-castle.com
(0871 265 2000)
En route, you will cruise through some beautiful countryside and villages. Also, Shrewley Tunnel, which is 433 yards long. It is wide enough for two boats to pass each other, but there is no footpath inside.
Edstone Aqueduct, at 474ft (145m), is the longest aqueduct in England. There is a towpath, which is level with the canal bed.

 

NB: This route has been provided as a guide only. Information may become inaccurate or out of date. You should always check with the marina that the route is possible within your time frame, current weather conditions and canal stoppages etc.

Boats

The following boats operate on this route (subject to availability)

Avon Valley (Sleeps a maximum of 4 People).

Blythe Valley (Sleeps a maximum of 6 People).

Cherwell Valley (Sleeps a maximum of 4 People).

Farndale Valley (Sleeps a maximum of 6 People).

Roman Valley (Sleeps a maximum of 6 People).

Tamar Valley (Sleeps a maximum of 7 People).

Tame Valley 6 (Sleeps a maximum of 6 People).

Tame Valley 8 (Sleeps a maximum of 8 People).

Wharfedale Valley (Sleeps a maximum of 6 People).

Maps and Guides

Pub Guide

Sorry, we have no pub guide for this route currently.

 

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The information above is provided in good faith to assist you with planning your canal boat holiday. Information accuracy cannot be guaranteed, however, if you do see something that needs updating, please don't hesitate to contact us.